• Previously, we have been looking at the life of Joseph found in the book of Genesis and how God wonderfully used Him. At the beginning of the story Joseph lived quite a pampered life as his father’s favourite son, the son of his old age.
  • However, as time passed, Joseph suffered many disappointments, rejections, betrayals, and false accusations beginning with his own brothers rejecting him and selling him as a slave to some traveling Ishmaelites.
  • At the end of the story God exalted Joseph to the most powerful position in Egypt, second only to Pharaoh himself. In the midst of a seven year famine Joseph’s brothers travelled to Egypt seeking food to save themselves and their families from starvation. When they arrived they were shocked to find Joseph, whom they presumed had died as a slave, ruling over Egypt as governor.
  • Perhaps even more shocking, Joseph was not vindictive or bitter. Joseph had unconditionally forgiven his brothers for the evil they had done to him, and he responded to them with love and compassion.
  • The question that arises is this: “How did Joseph reach such a place of love and self-sacrifice?”
  • As we study the story of Joseph’s suffering, we see how Joseph responded to God in his trials and how God worked in his heart to mold him into a godly man. His character had so dramatically changed that God entrusted him to become the saviour of Israel. Joseph is a prophetic picture of the ultimate Saviour of Israel and of all mankind—Jesus Christ.
  • The Bible exhorts believers to “put on the Lord Jesus Christ.” (Romans 13:14a). The Greek word for “put on” means “to dress, clothe.”
  • To “put on the Lord Jesus Christ” means that our thoughts, words, and actions should reflect the reality of what has happened within our reborn spirit.
  • This refers to the sanctification process, where we are to live out the new life that is already in us though our new birth.

 

Ephesians 4:21–24 (NKJV)

21if indeed you have heard Him and have been taught by Him, as the truth is in Jesus:

22that you put off, concerning your former conduct, the old man which grows corrupt according to the deceitful lusts,

23and be renewed in the spirit of your mind,

24and that you put on the new man which was created according to God, in true righteousness and holiness.

  • We see a very important principle in Ephesians 4:21-24.
  • If we want to be clothed with the new man, our new identity in Christ, we must first take off the old man, our former identity with its lusts and corruption.
  • We can’t put on new clothes until we’ve removed our old clothes. In a similar way we can’t live out our new life in Christ while continuing to think and live in ways that reflect our former life.
  • Many Christians become very frustrated because they are not able to walk victoriously in Christ. One of the reasons for their lack of victory is that they haven’t first removed the old man. They are trying to serve God while continuing to engage in ways of thinking and living that are contrary to Christ.
  • The Bible uses the analogy of clothing or outer garments to speak about our interaction with the world around us, how we perceive the world, and how we perceive ourselves.  
  • In the story of Joseph, three different garments had to be removed before he could be clothed with the glorious garments God had prepared for him—faith, hope and love. (1 Corinthians 13:13).
  • Each of these three garments reflect a mindset or attitude he had to be freed from before he could be effectively used by God and fully enter into God’s purposes for his life.
  • Similarly, there are three “garments” believers need to be willing to have removed, which reflect our old ways of thinking. Once removed, we can fully experience the freedom Christ has for us so we can enter into the purposes and ministry He has for each one of us.
  • Joseph had to have three coats removed to be clothed in such a way as to fulfill God’s will for his life.
  • Each garment that is removed makes room for a new garment to be worn.
  • The first coat Joseph wore was the coat of a son. This coat represented his identity as his father’s favourite son. Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other children and he made him a special tunic of many colours.
  • Joseph’s coat represented who he was—Jacob’s favourite son. The coat represented his sense of belonging to the family of Israel. The coat represented his identity.
  • When Joseph’s brothers stripped him of his coat it was not a simple gesture of hostility, it was a statement that they rejected Joseph as their brother and wanted to strip away his identity as part of their family.
  • The first coat Joseph had removed was his coat of a son which represented his identity and that he belonged to a family.
  • Joseph had to give up his right to be accepted and find his true identity in his relationship with God. Instead of becoming bitter he grew closer to God. He looked to God as his source of identity and acceptance.
  • We need to give up our right to be accepted and not feel so entitled that we demand that people accept us. Unless we give up our right to be accepted, we will respond actively with hostility and bitterness, or respond passively by isolating ourselves from everyone around us.
  • As followers of Jesus, we need to find our true identity and worth in Christ.
  • As the story progressed we saw that Joseph’s brother’s hatred was so intense that they not only betrayed Joseph by stripping him of his coat of a son, but sold him as a slave to a band of traveling Ishmaelites.
  • The Ishmaelites took Joseph to Egypt and sold him as a slave to a high ranking Egyptian official named Potiphar.
  • After Joseph was stripped of his coat of a son and sold into slavery he was given another coat—the coat of a servant.
  • One can only imagine the emotional trauma that Joseph experienced. Instead of living as the favourite son in a prosperous family, he was stolen away to a foreign country and unjustly sold into slavery.
  • However, Joseph prospered in his service to Potiphar, indicating that Joseph had overcome the trauma and bitterness of his brothers’ betrayal and his unjust enslavement.
  • Joseph was not only able to accept that his coat of a son had been stripped from him by his brothers, but he was able to accept the new coat placed on him by Potiphar—the coat of a servant.
  • Joseph chose to accept wearing the coat of a servant and faithfully served Potiphar.
  • For Joseph to faithfully serve Potiphar he had to accept his situation. Otherwise his service would have been carried out begrudgingly and half-heartedly.

 

Genesis 39:3 NKJV

3 And his master saw that the LORD was with him and that the LORD made all he did to prosper in his hand.

  • Joseph’s faith in God became a witness to Potiphar when Potiphar recognized that Joseph brought into his house a blessing from the Lord. “his master saw that the LORD was with him.” Potiphar recognized that his own prosperity was not simply the result of Joseph’s faithfulness and wisdom. He recognized that there was a supernatural element to his increasing prosperity.
  • Just when things were starting to improve for Joseph, Potiphar’s wife began to gaze at Joseph with lust. — “And it came to pass after these things that his master’s wife cast longing eyes on Joseph.”
  • Potiphar’s wife sought to seduce Joseph but he steadfastly refused her advances showing his moral integrity, his genuine loyalty to Potiphar, and his love and obedience to God.

“Look, my master does not know what is with me in the house, and he has committed all that he has to my hand.”

“How then can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God?”

  • The day came when she cornered Joseph as he was alone in the house doing his required work.
  • She tried to seduce him and again he resisted. This time her advances were so aggressive that she grabbed his clothing and the only thing he could do was run as fast as he could.
  • Potiphar’s wife took the garments she had torn from Joseph as he fled from her adulterous advances and used them as incriminating evidence that he had tried to rape her.
  • Joseph had been stripped of his coat because he was faithful and now his faithfulness was being used against him.
  • When Potiphar returned home she showed her husband Joseph’s garments as proof that he had tried to violate her. Potiphar flew into a rage without even considering the possibility that Joseph was innocent.
  • At that moment, Joseph ceased to be Potiphar’s most trustworthy and favourite servant. Now he was despised, hated, and maligned and his reputation lay in tatters.
  • He was judged by Potiphar as the most despicable of all men—one who abused his master’s trust and goodwill and who deceived and betrayed him in the most shameful and ungodly way.
  • Joseph experienced the very depth of betrayal. He was slandered, misunderstood, and unjustly condemned to a life sentence in an Egyptian prison.
  • As quickly as Joseph had been stripped of his coat of a son by his brothers, he had been stripped of his coat of a servant, and was now dressed in the coat of a prisoner.
  • Potiphar’s wife stripped him of his coat of a servant by tearing it from him as he fled from her, using his garment as proof of his crime.
  • Potiphar also stripped Joseph of his coat as a servant by unjustly condemning him and throwing him into prison.

 

Genesis 39:20-23 NKJV

20 Then Joseph’s master took him and put him into the prison, a place where the king’s prisoners were confined. And he was there in the prison.

21 But the LORD was with Joseph and showed him mercy, and He gave him favor in the sight of the keeper of the prison.

22 And the keeper of the prison committed to Joseph’s hand all the prisoners who were in the prison; whatever they did there, it was his doing.

23 The keeper of the prison did not look into anything that was under Joseph’s authority, because the LORD was with him; and whatever he did, the LORD made it prosper.

  • After Joseph was stripped of his coat of a servant and thrown into prison, he was given another coat—the coat of a prisoner.

“Then Joseph’s master took him and put him into the prison, a place where the king’s prisoners were confined. And he was there in the prison.”

  • This would possibly have been the lowest point in Joseph’s life. He had been rejected and betrayed by his brothers and now after many years of faithful service to Potiphar, he had been falsely accused by Potiphar’s wife and unjustly condemned by Potiphar to life in Pharaoh’s prison.
  • Joseph had been faithful to seek the Lord and to live a life of integrity for the glory of God. His situation, instead of improving, seemed to grow more dismal and hopeless.
  • In the midst of Joseph’s heartbreak and pain the Lord was moved with compassion and extended His loving and tender hand of mercy toward him.

“But the LORD was with Joseph and showed him mercy”

  • While it was necessary for Joseph to endure rejections, betrayals, and slander to be shaped into the glorious vessel God could use to be the saviour of Israel, it does not mean that God was unmoved by the sorrows, mental, and emotional anguish Joseph faced.
  • The first half of verse 21 speaks volumes about God’s heart of love and compassion for Joseph.
  • “But the LORD was with Joseph” — While Joseph sat in the prison cell with his emotions and thoughts reeling from what had taken place, he was not alone or abandoned. There was One who was with Joseph through it all. The Lord was with Joseph!
  • “and showed him mercy” — Not only was God with Joseph, He was there to comfort him in the midst of his heartbreak and confusion.
  • During his time in prison, Joseph grew closer to the Lord. As he turned to God and learned to receive comfort and encouragement from Him, Joseph’s faith and confidence in God grew.

 

2 Corinthians 1:3-4 NKJV

3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort,

4 who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.

  • When we feel heartbroken or crushed if we turn to God we will find the delight of knowing Him as the Father of mercies and the God of all comfort.

 

Psalm 105:17-20 NKJV

17 He sent a man before them—Joseph—who was sold as a slave.

18 They hurt his feet with fetters, He was laid in irons.

19 Until the time that his word came to pass, The word of the LORD tested him.

20 The king sent and released him, The ruler of the people let him go free.

  • Psalm 105 explains the purpose and the process Joseph had to go through to develop the godly character and the intimate walk with God necessary for him to be fully used by God.
  • “He sent a man before them—Joseph” — The circumstances that Joseph found himself in were the direct result of God’s leading. God sent Joseph ahead of his family so they could be saved from the future crisis.
  • There was nothing random or haphazard about the course of Joseph’s life. He had committed his life to God and God was directing his life.
  • “Joseph—who was sold as a slave” — Joseph’s journey began when his brothers betrayed him and sold him into slavery.
  • “They hurt his feet with fetters, He was laid in irons.” — Joseph’s imprisonment, although painful, fulfilled a number of important purposes in his life.
  • First, when Potiphar unjustly threw Joseph into prison he released him from being his slave. It was never God’s ultimate intention for Joseph to prosper as a slave in Potiphar’s house, but to be the ruler over Egypt and the saviour of Israel.
  • Second, Joseph was undergoing a deep work of character building through the hardships he was experiencing as he turned to the Lord.

“Until the time that his word came to pass, The word of the LORD tested him.”

  • The timing of Joseph’s release was not a random event but one explicitly chosen by God according to His Word.
  • During Joseph’s time in prison, God was teaching and purifying him for his future work. When it says, “the word of the Lord tested him,” the Hebrew word “tested” means much more than simply to test. It refers to the fiery refining process by which gold is purified.
  • God’s Word provides all we need to not only weather the storms of life, but to find that place of peace and joy in the midst of the storms.

 

Isaiah 26:3 NKJV

3 You will keep him in perfect peace, Whose mind is stayed on You, Because he trusts in You.

  • In the midst of the storms of life, God’s Word promises that we can experience and enjoy perfect peace—that “shalom, shalom” of God’s presence.
  • However, the condition is that our minds must be “stayed on” God which means to have our thoughts fully leaning on, captivated by, and filled with God and His faithfulness. In other words to abide in Christ and have His words abide in us.
  • The only way we will be able to keep our minds stayed on God in the midst of turmoil and fear is when we have learned to fully trust Him.
  • Through all Joseph’s trials, apparent setbacks, and heartbreak, step by step he grew in his relationship with God until he came to the point that nothing moved him from his faith, devotion, and love for God.
  • We need to develop the essential discipline of keeping our minds stayed on God. We are not to awfulize the situation but to glorify God in the situation.
  • Our godly response justifies our faith before others.
  • We are not to meditate on the “what ifs” of life but the “yes and amens” of God’s promises.

 

2 Corinthians 1:20 NKJV

20 For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

21 But the LORD was with Joseph and showed him mercy, and He gave him favor in the sight of the keeper of the prison.

  • Joseph did not drown in despair but looked to God, and accepted his situation. He continued to serve God and those around him wholeheartedly, just as he had previously served Potiphar. Joseph rose above his circumstances to serve God and others.

22 And the keeper of the prison committed to Joseph’s hand all the prisoners who were in the prison; whatever they did there, it was his doing.

23 The keeper of the prison did not look into anything that was under Joseph’s authority, because the LORD was with him; and whatever he did, the LORD made it prosper.

  • Because of Joseph’s godly response the Lord was able to bless him and prosper him. If he had withdrawn, become bitter and unresponsive then Joseph would not have been able to receive the blessings that God wanted to shower upon him.

 

Genesis 40 NKJV

1 It came to pass after these things that the butler and the baker of the king of Egypt offended their lord, the king of Egypt.

2 And Pharaoh was angry with his two officers, the chief butler and the chief baker.

3 So he put them in custody in the house of the captain of the guard, in the prison, the place where Joseph was confined.

4 And the captain of the guard charged Joseph with them, and he served them; so they were in custody for a while.

 

  • After a time, as Joseph continued to faithfully serve in the prison, two men from Pharaoh’s court, his chief butler and his chief baker, were thrown into prison and were put under Joseph’s care.
  • Once again, what seemed like random events were in reality God’s hand working behind the scenes to fulfill God’s purpose for Joseph’s life.

5 Then the butler and the baker of the king of Egypt, who were confined in the prison, had a dream, both of them, each man’s dream in one night and each man’s dream with its own interpretation.

6 And Joseph came in to them in the morning and looked at them, and saw that they were sad.

7 So he asked Pharaoh’s officers who were with him in the custody of his lord’s house, saying, “Why do you look so sad today?”

8 And they said to him, “We each have had a dream, and there is no interpreter of it.” So Joseph said to them, “Do not interpretations belong to God? Tell them to me, please.”

  • One morning Joseph noticed that the butler and the baker looked sad. When he discovered they each had a dream that perplexed them, Joseph made a bold faith-filled statement, “Do not interpretations belong to God? Tell them to me, please.”
  • Joseph the dreamer who had received dreams from the Lord and who had developed a discerning ear to hear from the Holy Spirit asserted that he could interpret their dreams because he heard from God.

12 And Joseph said to him, “This is the interpretation of it: The three branches are three days.

13 Now within three days Pharaoh will lift up your head and restore you to your place, and you will put Pharaoh’s cup in his hand according to the former manner, when you were his butler.

14 But remember me when it is well with you, and please show kindness to me; make mention of me to Pharaoh, and get me out of this house.

15 For indeed I was stolen away from the land of the Hebrews; and also I have done nothing here that they should put me into the dungeon.”

  • Joseph correctly interpreted the butler’s dream and declared that in three days Pharaoh would restore him to his former position.
  • Joseph also correctly understood that this encounter with the butler was orchestrated by the Lord and would lead to his release from his life sentence.

“But remember me when it is well with you, and please show kindness to me; make mention of me to Pharaoh, and get me out of this house.”

  • Joseph was still struggling with the injustice he had endured and he was hoping that a righteous judgment from Pharaoh would release him from his bondage so he could live a life of freedom.

“For indeed I was stolen away from the land of the Hebrews; and also I have done nothing here that they should put me into the dungeon.”

 

Genesis 40

23 Yet the chief butler did not remember Joseph, but forgot him.

 

  • After the chief butler was released from prison and restored to his former position, just as Joseph had corrected predicted, he totally forgot about Joseph, his plight, and his remarkable gift for interpreting dreams.
  • How could the butler simply have forgotten about his dream which changed the course of his life or the profound and accurate interpretation he received from Joseph?
  • It was the hand of the Lord that caused the butler to forget about Joseph.
  • Imagine Joseph’s confusion after the butler’s release and the apparent silence from the one he pleaded to for help.
  • There was still work to be done in Joseph before he would be ready to fully enter into God’s purposes.

 

Genesis 41

1 Then it came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh had a dream; and behold, he stood by the river.

  • Joseph was so sure that God had brought the butler into the prison, given him the dream, and Joseph the correct interpretation as the means for Joseph to be released. However, Joseph received no deliverance, no opportunity to have his case heard before Pharaoh, and no justice for the wrongs he had endured. Weeks flowed into months until two full years passed.

 

Genesis 41

9 Then the chief butler spoke to Pharaoh, saying: “I remember my faults this day.

  • After two full years the final stage in Joseph’s preparation was complete and the time for his release had come.  
  • God  caused  two things to take place that would result in Joseph’s release:
  • God gave Pharaoh a dream which greatly perplexed him and which no one could interpret.
  • God reminded the chief butler about Joseph’s ability to interpret dreams.

 

Genesis 41

10 When Pharaoh was angry with his servants, and put me in custody in the house of the captain of the guard, both me and the chief baker,

11 we each had a dream in one night, he and I. Each of us dreamed according to the interpretation of his own dream.

12 Now there was a young Hebrew man with us there, a servant of the captain of the guard. And we told him, and he interpreted our dreams for us; to each man he interpreted according to his own dream.

13 And it came to pass, just as he interpreted for us, so it happened. He restored me to my office, and he hanged him.”

  • The butler recounted to Pharaoh the dream he had in prison and how Joseph had correctly interpreted the dream and how it had been fulfilled.

 

Genesis 41:14–16 (NKJV)

14Then Pharaoh sent and called Joseph, and they brought him quickly out of the dungeon; and he shaved, changed his clothing, and came to Pharaoh.

15And Pharaoh said to Joseph, “I have had a dream, and there is no one who can interpret it. But I have heard it said of you that you can understand a dream, to interpret it.”

16So Joseph answered Pharaoh, saying, “It is not in me; God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”

  • When Pharaoh heard about Joseph and how he had successfully, astoundingly, and accurately interpreted the dreams of his chief butler and chief baker he immediate called for Joseph to be brought to him.

“Then Pharaoh sent and called Joseph”

  • However, before Joseph could leave the prison and stand before Pharaoh he had to do two things—he had to shave and change his clothes. No one could stand before Pharaoh unless he was well groomed and dressed in the proper attire.

“he shaved, changed his clothing, and came to Pharaoh.”

  • Previously Joseph had two coats removed from him—the coat of a son and the coat of a servant.
  • Joseph did not remove these coats nor did he want these coats removed from him. They were forcibly removed by his brothers who rejected him, and by Potiphar’s wife and Potiphar.
  • Joseph had to be willing to give up his right to be accepted and he had to give up his right to be understood so he would not be permanently scarred and bound.
  • However, his third coat was not forcibly removed from Joseph; he had to choose to remove it himself. This was the coat of a prisoner.
  • Joseph could not leave the prison unless he chose to take off his coat of a prisoner and put on clothing fit for a royal meeting with Pharaoh in his court.
  • However, for Joseph to remove his prison clothes that he had worn daily for many years, wash and shave himself and put on clothing suitable for standing in the presence of royalty meant he had to be willing to give up something.
  • As the first coat of a son was removed, he had to give up his right to be accepted.
  • As the second coat of a servant was removed, he had to give up his right to be understood.
  • For the third coat of a prisoner to be removed, he had to give up his right for vindication.
  • When Joseph took off his prison garb, shaved and washed himself and put on the clothing Pharaoh provided, all the outward appearance of the betrayal and false imprisonment he had endured for thirteen years vanished. Without his prison clothes, Joseph appeared like one who had lived a life of comfort, freedom, and prosperity.
  • When Joseph changed his clothing, he took off the coat of a victim and gave up his right for vindication and revenge.
  • If Joseph wanted to seek vindication and see those who had wronged him punished, he needed to look like he had suffered greatly at the hands of others. However, all dressed up and clean shaven he looked great!
  • Joseph had a choice to make.
  • If Joseph stood before Pharaoh dressed in fine clothes, complaining how badly he had been betrayed and wronged over many years, his words would have rung hollow.
  • If Joseph refused to remove his prison garb and dress himself in the clothes provided by Pharaoh, he would have remained shut up in the prison.

 

  • Christians often live in their past hurts, continuing to hold on to the wrongs they have suffered, continuing to blame others for the misery, wounds, and hardships they have endured. They continue to live in the prison of their past hurts.
  • Just as Pharaoh called Joseph out of the prison and he voluntarily took off his coat of a prisoner and put on the clothes of a free man that Pharaoh offered him, we as believers need to give up our right for vindication and remove our coats of a victim and dress ourselves with the royal robes of righteousness that God has given us as His children!
  • If a Christian begins to walk in forgiveness and the wholeness that comes from stirring up the joy of our salvation, we will no longer wear the coat of a victim, but royal robes as sons and daughters of God.
  • When we walk in the love, joy, and peace that God has given us then the last remnants of the hurts and wrongs of the past begin to be washed away and people would never guess the abuse and injustice we suffered in the past.

15And Pharaoh said to Joseph, “I have had a dream, and there is no one who can interpret it. But I have heard it said of you that you can understand a dream, to interpret it.”

16So Joseph answered Pharaoh, saying, “It is not in me; God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”

  • As Joseph stood before Pharaoh, Pharaoh declared that he had had a dream that perplexed and troubled him one that no one in the royal court could explain or interpret. “I have had a dream, and there is no one who can interpret it.”
  • Joseph’s response reflected the deep and wonderful work God had accomplished within him.
  • Joseph had only one word for Pharaoh, “It is not in me; God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”
  • Joseph’s answer reflected a man filled with God’s peace, wisdom, and faith.
  • First, Joseph stated that “It is not in me” reflecting his total dependence upon the Lord.
  • No longer was Joseph’s focus on himself or his plight or his gifts and talents. He had become an empty vessel that God could fill and use for His glory.
  • Second, as he stood before Pharaoh, Joseph never even mentioned his past wrongs, injustices, or betrayals. Joseph was an overcomer and had truly learned from the depth of his heart how to give up his right to be accepted, his right to be understood, and his right for vindication.
  • Joseph didn’t try to tell Pharaoh about all the misfortunes and injustices he had endured. Two short years before, Joseph had pleaded with Pharaoh’s chief butler to bring up his case before Pharaoh. Now as he stood before Pharaoh, Joseph remained silent regarding his plight.
  • Joseph recognized that he stood before Pharaoh for only one reason—to give Pharaoh the word that God had for him.
  • Third, as Joseph stood before Pharaoh he displayed a remarkable level of faith and confidence in God. “God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”
  • Pharaoh had received a dream from the Lord whose interpretation and meaning totally baffled and perplexed not only Pharaoh but his entire royal court. Without even asking for any details of the dream, Joseph boldly announced that God would provide him with the correct interpretation.
  • Fourth, as Joseph stood before Pharaoh, he was able to declare peace over Pharaoh. “God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”
  • Joseph could give Pharaoh an answer of peace because Joseph had peace in his own heart.
  • When we have turmoil in our hearts then everything we do and say is coloured by that inner turmoil. However, here stood Joseph who had suffered many wrongs and injustices, declaring peace over Pharaoh.

 

John 14:27 NKJV

27 Peace I leave with you, My peace I give to you; not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.

  • Christ has given us a peace that is not dependent upon this world. This world is filled with uncertainty, turmoil, and fear but God has given us a peace that is unshakeable because it comes from Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace.

 

Colossians 3:15 NKJV

15 And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful.

  • The Holy Spirit uses this peace to guide and direct us. If we do not learn to cultivate and be led by this peace we can become reactive, impulsive, and unstable, and be more likely to make wrong decisions.

 

Genesis 41

38 And Pharaoh said to his servants, “Can we find such a one as this, a man in whom is the Spirit of God?”

39 Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Inasmuch as God has shown you all this, there is no one as discerning and wise as you.

  • After Joseph provided Pharaoh with the correct interpretation of his dreams, Pharaoh, along with his entire court, was astounded at Joseph’s wisdom and integrity.

 

Genesis 41

40 You shall be over my house, and all my people shall be ruled according to your word; only in regard to the throne will I be greater than you.”

41 And Pharaoh said to Joseph, “See, I have set you over all the land of Egypt.”

42 Then Pharaoh took his signet ring off his hand and put it on Joseph’s hand; and he clothed him in garments of fine linen and put a gold chain around his neck.

  • Not only did Pharaoh declare Joseph a righteous man who possessed great wisdom that originated from God, he also declared that Joseph was to be placed in the highest position of honour and authority in all of Egypt—to rule at the right hand of Pharaoh.

 

Genesis

43 And he had him ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried out before him, “Bow the knee!” So he set him over all the land of Egypt.

  • Everyone in Egypt would bow their knee to Joseph as his chariot drove through the land, including Potiphar and his wife who had wronged and maligned him.
  • The dreams Joseph received from the Lord so many years before were fulfilled in a way and through a process Joseph could never have imagined!
  • Eventually, all the wrongs Joseph experienced were put right by the Righteous Judge—the Lord Himself!
  • As Pharaoh declared before all of Egypt Joseph’s righteousness and integrity it was really the Lord who was making that declaration.
  • Joseph was vindicated in a way most people would not have expected. Instead of those who had wronged and betrayed him being punished, he became their saviour. He rescued Egypt and all the surrounding lands from the famine that was about to overtake them.
  • Those who would experience deliverance at the hands of Joseph would include his brothers who betrayed him and Potiphar and his wife who imprisoned him.
  • Pharaoh put a new coat on Joseph—the robes of royalty.
  • The garments of royalty that Joseph had been given would never have to be removed.
  • Joseph’s final coat was the robe of authority and glory as he entered into God’s purpose for his life.
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